Samsung Business Strategy in Post Steve Jobs Era

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Apple Inc. continues to fight Samsung Electronics Co. in courts around the world over tablet and smartphone designs Apple says are too similar to the iPhone and iPad. Despite the legal wrangling, Samsung seems to be taking some cues from the Apple playbook on other fronts as well.
Apple Inc. continues to fight Samsung Electronics Co. in courts around the world over tablet and smartphone designs Apple says are too similar to the iPhone and iPad. Despite the legal wrangling, Samsung seems to be taking some cues from the Apple playbook on other fronts as well.
Samsung Adhub
The end of March marked the opening of Samsung's first branded store. The company chose to start simple by partnering with Phones 4u to create a store-within-a-store in London. Apple is likely to take exception to the clean and minimalistic decor that calls to mind Apple's own retail stores. As is true of Apple's shops, staff members are well trained on the Samsung devices and customers can thoroughly test-drive the product line before buying.

The mini-store format offers Samsung a way to dip a toe into the direct-to-consumer marketplace without an overly large financial commitment, yet there's plenty of room to grow by adding new retail partners and expanding into stand-alone locations.

Samsung's second development is, from a consumer perspective, a little less exciting. Its new AdHub is currently in beta testing. According to the company website, the goal is to give advertisers a convenient way to plan campaigns that target consumers across a number of devices, from smartphones to Internet-enabled televisions. This should offer advertisers a more streamlined experience. Of course, the idea may have been influenced by Apple's iAd service, which offers advertisers a number of ways to target customers who use specific devices or meet other demographic criteria.

Innovators like Apple will always have imitators, and the passing of Steve Jobs hasn t distracted the company from aggressively protecting its products in court. At the same time, competitors would be foolish to ignore Apple's proven strategies. Ultimately, it's good for the consumer and good for the marketplace when competitors continue to up the ante and push each other to create better products.


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